yellow and black f 1 car on road during daytime

A Storytelling Lesson from Formula 1 🏎️

You may have noticed that sport is not the only business of sports. There is always inherent drama in a good sports matchup, but not everybody is into the game itself.

Who are these people? What in the world are they doing? And why? Why would I watch something I don’t understand?

Formula 1 racing used to be a sport enjoyed almost exclusively by older, well-off European males. Complex rules, complicated courses, and a format that makes it hard to follow all meant the sport was just too difficult for a casual observer to enjoy. But recently, TV viewership for races has exploded, F1 events are selling out, and the stands are filled with new fans. Women are in the crowd–and young people. What happened?

Storytelling.

The key driver behind the explosion of F1 racing into new markets is storytelling.

Drive to Survive is a Netflix show about the people behind Formula 1 racing. The show focuses on the characters–drivers and billionaire owners–and gives us an insider’s view. There is very little actual racing. The narrative introduces the sport to us a little at a time.

As these stories unfold, people become more familiar with the sport and its key players. They begin to care about the people involved. They gain a basic understanding of the rules. They can follow along.

Isn’t this what we want for our supporters, too?

ESPN’s 30 for 30: Pink Card tells the story of women in Iran and their love for soccer–and their quest for freedom. The series is about the injustices faced by women in Iran, as illustrated by the struggle of female soccer fans fighting for the right to attend soccer matches at the national stadium.

These sports shows do the same things your stories have to do: provide a gradual, understandable explanation of your mission without sensationalizing or trivializing it, and without alientating long-time supporters. (Okay, these shows might sensationalize…but I hope you won’t.)

Just as people interested in the “characters” who drive F1 race cars can learn about Formula 1 racing by watching stories on Netflix, soccer fans can learn about gender inequality and human rights abuses by listening to four episodes of the 30 for 30 podcast. With stories, outsiders can gain awareness about your cause, understand why your work is important, and how they can get involved.

Storytelling builds bridges.

Storytelling is what takes people who don’t know about your mission and moves them–step by step–into a supporting role.

What story will you tell next?

Kay Helm

I help missionaries and organizations tell powerful and effective stories that inspire action.

KayHelm.com

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